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Having a "No Day". . .

 


For the almost 20 years that she lived in Mexico, one of my late mother's Irish friends frequently mentioned having a "No Day."  A day with no social obligations, chores, tasks, or other work that interfered with whatever personal interests took one's fancy on the day in question.

Since today -- a gray and chilly Saturday -- is Mom's birthday, the Grand Duchess is out with friends, and the Young Master is ensconced on the sofa in the TV room with a cold, yours truly is taking his own such No Day.  I think Mom would approve of my decision to make the world go away, as the old Eddie Arnold song intoned, even if only for a little while.

So, I will spend Saturday afternoon focused on that first squadron and small regimental staff of Eureka Saxon cuirassiers.  These have stood waiting  untouched over on the painting table for almost three weeks while we skied and otherwise gadded about with snowy, winter outdoor activities.

I hope to share a painting update Sunday afternoon.  Stay tuned.

-- Stokes

 

A Sunday Morning P.S.

Managed two, or perhaps three sessions in the painting chair yesterday and got a few things accomplished.  Following some preparation for Monday's classes with my students today (Sunday), and the long delayed delivery of several pieces of family furniture midday, it's back to the chair to tackle two or three additional painting tasks before a photo update, which I will share here in a new post.  The 16 Eureka figures still don't look like much, but we are nevertheless plodding forward like skiers through very wet snow.

 

Comments

Andy McMaster said…
A No Day is a fine idea! We all need those once in a while. Look forward to seeing the update on the Saxons.
Conrad Kinch said…
There's a lot to be said for that idea.
David Morfitt said…
That's a great idea! Glad to hear you managed to do more work on your troops. Perhaps it should be renamed a Yes To Creativity Day to make it sound more positive and upbeat! ;-)

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