11 March 2013

Moments of Clarity through the Fog. . .

This illustration is more a comment on how I've felt the last few days than it is on my mental and/or
hobby acuity, but it seemed somewhat apt for today's post. 

Once in a while, glimmers of brilliance shine through the fog brought on by fever, cold, odd sleep patterns, and over-the-counter medications.  It occurred to me sometime during the 24-hour period that was this last Saturday what I might do with three odd Blue Moon 18th century duelists that were part of a bunch of unpainted figures, purchased from one of two Jims a few years back.  So, I stole down here to Zum Stollenkeller about an hour ago for the first time since Friday midday and went to work with hobby knife, pin vice drill, a few matchsticks, thin card, and crazy glue.  

I now have a virile young artist with his shirt open to his navel (think Fabio on the cover of any number of bodice buster novels twenty years or so ago), who holds his painter's palette in his left hand and a brush in his right, with which he is checking his perspective on an unfolding battle (or frolicking aristocrats) in the distance.  He will be observed in his work by his patron, a local country gentleman and neighbor to Aunt Hiltrud, the most formidable of the Grand Duke's three aunts.  The as yet unnamed gentleman's valet stands at the ready to assist when the great artiste calls, "Oil!  I need more linseed oil. . .  And a palette knife.  From that trunk on the bench over there!"  

The miniature easel with canvas  -- made from toothpicks and heavy white card held together with the super glue -- is setting right now.  If I feel well enough this evening, I might return and finish gluing the rest of that tedious contraption together before calling it a day.  Stayed tuned for a few photos once everything is ready for base-coating.  Until then, I remain your faithful servant. . . 

-- Mondo Dismo

2 comments:

Martin said...

Hey Stokes,

Brilliant! If you put a small shelf on the bottom of the easel, you would be able to change the canvas to whatever subject has caught the artist's eye.

Martin

Conrad Kinch said...

What a wonderful piece of work Stokes. You should be very proud.

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