11 August 2013

The Situtation at the Close of Turn 8. . .

 General de Latte's first assault across the River Elbow comes to a standstill thanks to Stollenian musketeers and artillery  Not much is left of the first wave of von Flickenhoffer's Fusilers (foreground), and the Ermland Garde (background) have suffered badly the hands of von Tschatschke's 13th Musketeers.

For the next hour, General de Latte's advance stalled as his officers and NCOs attempted to sort out their men and restore some sort of order.  By 7:30pm, General von Tschatschke asked for the return of his telescope from the Grand Duke-Irwin Amadeus II, who remarked cheerily, "I say!  Did you know that if you look through the other end of this thingy, everything looks farther away?" Von Tschatschke raised an eyebrow in reply, as did Hives, and took back his telescope.  He surveyed the scene before him.  


 Reduced below 50% of their initial strength, de Latte's remaining Irish Grenzers (in the distance) turn tail and flee while the Mittau Volunteers attempt to recover from brutal musketry and cannon fire.


Von Tschatschke noted the great gaps that had opened up in the Zichenauer front line thanks to his infantry and artillery.  Much of de Latte's army had ceased fire and seemed to be wavering.  An odd lull hung over much of the battlefield save for the occasional clatter of another musket volley in the distance or the thunder of the Stollenian guns.  


Flush with their recent triumph over the squadron of enemy hussars, and contrary to his explicit orders, General von Tschatschke's  Jaeger zu Fuss advance and fire on the right flank of de Latte's reserve line, inflicting light casualties (one artilleryman and a company officer in the Ermland Garde).


Von Tschatschke finished scanning the scene before him.  He snapped his telescope shut, handed it to a nearby aide, and pondered the situation for a moment.  Should his men be permitted to continue firing on the enemy at will now, or should he order an advance across the less treacherous stretches of the Elbow followed by a bayonet charge?


Meanwhile, in General von Tschatschke's rear area, the Leib Grenadiers and 4th Dragoons have just about reached their intended new positions in support of the western flank.

9 comments:

Der Alte Fritz said...

No! Do not counter attack across the Elbow? You have already defeated de Latte, what more could be gained but to lose some of your men and letting the victory slip from your grasp.

Frederick

Conrad Kinch said...

Close with the bayonet - it is the only way to be sure.

Der Alte Fritz said...

As Napoleon said, "when your opponent is defeating himself, do not get in his way."

John said...

Attack! They'll run like children behind a bratwurst wagon!

tidders said...

Let the faltering attack retire, pursue with cavalry and light infantry if have advantage

-- Allan

CelticCurmudgeon said...

Offer them terms. I would suggest that they be allowed to withdraw in exchange for a substantial indemnity in gold and tasteful bratwurst.

Bloggerator said...

Dear General de Latte,

Perhaps a pinning attack to the enemy's front followed up by a right hook around the river next time?

de L

Ken said...

See them off, albeit judiciously (use the light horse as opportunity presents).

Keith Flint said...

Great to see the return of real wargaming to the site. Particularly impressed by the quality of the photos - the final one of this post is a cracker.

Best wishes, Keith.

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